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allowed business owners to refuse to serve gays by citing their religion beliefs. here is what the governor said just minutes ago. >> after weighing all the arguments i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation i want you to know that i understand that long held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. i could divide in arizona in ways we could never imagine and no one would ever want. religious liberty is a core, american and arizona value. so is nondiscrimination. going forward, let's turn the ugliness of the debate over senate bill 1062 into a renewed search for greater respect and understanding among all arizonans and americans. >> many people owned this bill because -- opposed this bill because they believe it provided political will to discriminate. brian rooney explains. >> protest was loud, where the legislature once again they said made
is pouring rights to religion out the window. host: what do you mean? caller: the bill is for private individuals to have their own -- that have their own business to serve whatever customer they want to serve. i think that's the law anyway. universal law. they should be able to do that. nobody should be against that. not like telling somebody else how to run their own business because you're a consumer. host: what about the issue of discriminating on the basis of race. are you opening the door to allow that? based on religious views? >> no. because i think that's a person's thing, how your skin is is how you're born. how you choose to conduct yourself, that's something you choose. host: from florida. >> i want to -- caller: i want to bring up a point, the people that are discriminating and oppressing others are always going to cry that they are being oppressed and discriminated against when ople seek to end the discrimination and oppression that they are performing. did that make sense to you? host: appreciate you chiming in with your thoughts. here are the thoughts of senator john m
fall simply along religious lines. i think there are a range of factors, politics, religion, economics and ideas about gender and sectixuality that impact ho people are safe or not. >> a quick thought: is there any effort at, say, embargos or sanctions against countries like uganda that have initiated these very tough laws? >> this is an incredibly controversial issue. there is a lot of debate about this. the uganda and lgbt movement is in heavy debate. civil society activists called for foreign governments to review their policies on foreign aid to uganda. they didn't call for foreign governments to withdraw aid. and this is a very important distinction that i hope hear. >> said, some governments have already made decisions about how the anti-homosexuality bill and now law will affect their aid to uganda and the government of denmark was one of the first to change its policies saying its hundreds of millions of dollars a year will no longer be given to the ugandan government, but it will be distributed among civil society in uganda. >> jessica sturn, thanks. >> thank you. >>> after t
of behavior do you think they could get away with, based on religion? i mean, what we're talking about here is an amendment to an existing law that has been in place since 1999. it simply is closing -- well, not really a loophole, but court interpretation. it was originally passed as when you were an individual and went into a business or marketplace, you don't lose your religious freedoms, but some courts have interpreted that. but they also put in place a test that would prove, you have to prove you have the basis for your religious objection. >> a lot of people ignored that. you couldn't just go out and -- and make up a religious belief. let me ask you this, folks on the other side this is what this bill was, the modern-day equivalent of you can deny services of blacks who want to marry whites. blacks that used to get together, that used to be against the bible, against god's teaching. that was outlawed for three centuries and was not deemed illegal to do so to discriminate against blacks and whites who want to marry until 1867. and folks opposed to it said this is the modern-day equival
religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
religion and then fly into your eyes. >> this is obviously a relief for you. they served like 40 years and isn't that close enough to a life term anyway? it is not like they could do much now because they are so old. do you buy that a? >> they should do it the way the white house does with turkeys. put information and allow the people to vote, you know what i mean? this is cletis, he is a member and this is gold tooth. he is uh allergic to cleetis. >> that is true coming from you. >> you are a family of five, but got probation because you said the judge was, quote, super hot. how do you feel about this new thing? >> i am very grateful to have received a fair trial and have been acquitted. i don't understand this idea of governors pardoning people or giving them parole. after going through the process then one person can let them go after a board reviews whatever? but it is ultimately their say? that is ridiculous. these poor vehicle times who experienced comfort and know they have life in prison, then that goes away. >> that is the thing that kills me. they were hugging and crying 20 y
story but prince princed kings begin in kiev, and religion has the root roots in v as well. and certainly, vladimir putin, as a state builder, and somebody who wants to reassert to some extent what he calls awe uration union. >> rose: a uration union. >> that would include belarus and parse of central asia, and so on-- that the core of that is russia ukraine. and yet within ukraine, you have until some days ago, yae, who was loyal to moscow. you have the western part of ukraine which speaks ukrainian and leans towards the european union. you have the eastern part of ukraine that speaks russian predominantly, and leans towards moscow, and the crimea which leaps towards russia as well. there are all kinds of divisions here. what i would say is yanukovich was awful. on the other hand, he was democratically elected. and he was overthrown in the streets. he murder dozens of his open people. >> rose: during the protests. >> absolutely. he was as corrupt as corrupt could be. we are now in the-- in that very familiar moment that we've experienced over and over and over again in rec
" series beat hockey. >> what? >> god bigger than hockey? >> that's religion in canada. >> also people should know, the movie is coming out in spanish and korean at the same time. >> in america. >> in america. >> did you just shoot -- do you shoot a lot more? roma, you star in this movie. you're terrific as mary. did you guys shoot a lot more scenes out there? >> we did. we knew when we were shooting "the bible" series that the jesus narrative began to unfold that we had something spectacular, and jesus hasn't been on the big screen for 10 years. 50 years since this was told. we shot additional footage. we put the movie together and this friday it opens in 3,000 theaters across the country. >> wow. look at you. >> roma just told me an amazing thing. tell me about abe foxman with the jewish -- >> we have worked across denominations and reaching out to the jewish community through abe foxman at the ado to make sure we told this movie sensitively setting a political and historic context. >> right. >> presenting the story in a way that really just emphasized the love of jesus, and mr. foxm
service to gays and lesbians or anyone that disagrees with the business people's religion. so a muslim taxi driver could ,efuse to take a jewish person or a single woman traveling by herself. rush limbaugh has no credibility at all. the legislation was trying to write in prejudice, and to use his words, bullying and coercion into civil law and that is not allowed. a great have changed deal. when you have this massive corporate lobby putting pressure , isn't your traditional, you know, gay and lesbian activist and their supporters -- you had corporate america saying no to prejudice. >> because they recognize the economic realities here. g power as well as our allies as well as -- you know, i maintain the majority of americans are good, decent people, and they will not tolerate this kind of abuse of a legal process. the corporations recognize that as well. marriott, american airlines, delta airlines, apple was going to build a manufacturing plant in mesa, arizona -- vetott romney tweeted to the bill. >> leadership on the republican side. the two u.s. senators from the arizona side as wel
to have unwelcome contact with the cross, arguing it comes to governmental promotion of religion. >> it is government speech. they are making a statement here with this religious symbol. >> there are other memorials to other wars nearby. miss.e cross is hard to the park and planning commission tells me they have not been served, so they cannot comment. they also tell me the peace cross has always been a tribute to war heroes and nothing more. are there any plans to remove it at this point? >> at this point, i don't believe so. >> nor should it be removed, some say. >> you have to be kidding. >> at the nearby american legion, i say it is not just up in arms but he takes it personally. >> to me it is like slapping veterans in the face. it's a tribute to veterans. i have no idea what they have against veterans. planningrk and commission has 60 days to respond to the lawsuit. both sides say they are ready to fight over the peace cross. in bladensburg, greta kreuz, abc 7 news. >> thank you, greta. >> are remember that since i was a little kid. caps? >> back in action, back on the ice
explained how religion actually brought them together. "hannity" starts right here, right now. >> bombhell testimony on capitol hill from a left-leaning law professor who says that thanks to obama's actions, we are at a constitutional tipping point. >> the president has created an atmosphere, the rate at which the executive power is being concentrated in our system is accelerating. and frankly i am very alarmed by the implications of that aggregation of power. i believe we are now at a constitutional tipping point in our system. it is a dangerous point for our system to be in. and i believe that your response has to given before this president leaves office. no one in our system goes it alone. >> and joining me now to explain exactly what he meant is the man you just heard from, george washington university law professor, jonathan turley. professor, welcome back, good to see you. >> thank you very much, sean. >> a very serious charge. you packed a lot in there. you do not agree with me on a lot of political issues but you may agree with me on this, explain why you took a strong stance. >>
on religion or race or anything. we have to routes is out and make sure this doesn't ever happen again. people don't feel like it can happen. recommendations are an important part of that. we look forward to additional recommendations. the second topic, has come up today, what is the irs doing to ensure that it has better resources with taxpayer concerns to ensure the phone is being picked up and the chair made the comment, your data, the responses are pretty weak. and i would like to maybe turns this, not enough people to answer all the questions or concerns taxpayers have court is the problem that the code is so cumbersome and riddled with exemptions and loopholes and problems that average everyday working americans could possibly attempts to figure out as they hire accountants and lawyers and we have 4 million words in this code and it grows by the second with the regulatory side as well. the problem we need more people to answer the problems americans have with the code or the problem is the code itself? >> it is all of the above. i will defer to ms. olson in a moment but it is a 0 sum gam
of religion, that goes to the contraception mandate. they can spin this any way they want, it is really the catholic churches, right? and for example in boston they're no longer in the business and service and ministry of adoption, why? because if they don't send the children to gay couples they're out of it. and in washington, d.c., the same thing. that is a fundamental change in the way the united states of america operates as a country. >> we'll be right back after a break. we'll continue, coming up next tonight right here on hannity. >> not driven by any moral circumstances, it is driven by budget considerations. he would much rather spend the money on food stamps than he would on support for our troops. >> the vice president was not the only one to slam the decision to gut the america's military. we'll weigh in on the national security right after the break and much more on this special edition of "hannity." [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whethe
's all right, it's okay to start dating. >> what religion is that? >> we're christian denomination called cedar hills tabernacle. >> i've been by there. >> really? you are welcome anytime to go visit. >> looks good. >> yeah. >> it seems tom was right not to discuss his family situation with the barber. where do you want to go? >> i'm not so for or against homosexuality. the way i believe, god is nod mat at the people, but he's mad at the fact there is homosexuality. >> so you think it's not a good thing? >> i don't think it's a good thing at all. it's horrible to see especially in the public or around young kids. it's a bad influence on them. >> what would you say if i said that the man's hair you just cut is a gay parent and that kid has two gay dads? >> i'm willing to work with them, whatever, as long as no crazy thing goes on. >> the other thing is they're transgenders, they used to be women. >> really? i would have never guessed that part. that's crazy. i don't know what to say to that part. no, i mean, hey, that's his business. it's not the way it's supposed to be, of course, but can
for the sake of his country and religion. the current rulers in egypt are to be blamed. >> over the last few weeks there has been strikes and protests by workers who want to be paid more. keeping a lid on these will be a challenge for the new cabinet. it has not got much time to do anything. in the next few months presidential and parliamentary elections are due to get underway. once again there'll be another deposit in egypt. >> al jazeera continues to demand the release of its staff held in egypt. mohamed fadel fahmy, mohammed badr, and peter greste have spent 64 days in prin. they are accused of having links to a terrorist organization and spreading follows news. al jazeera relates the charges. another journalist, abdullah al-shami from the network's arabic channel has been on hunger strike for a month, after his imprisonment in august. >> let's look at the weather - beginning in california, i think. >> we are familiar with the situation that we have in california. and here, over the last few days we have seen a change in weather. we have seen the pineapple express bring in moisture, and
be affected i race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and other cultural variables. remarkablys are resilient after experiencing trauma. send to go on to experience long-term difficulties. the data indicates that in fiscal year 2012 post about it trusts this order in depressive disorders were the mental health diagnoses most commonly associated with mst. were other inside he disorders, bipolar, substance use disorders, and schizophrenia and psychotic disorders. veterans often struggle with physical health conditions and other problems such as homelessness. with regard to suicide, research has shown that trauma in general is associated with suicide and suicidal behavior. this is true for civilian and military populations. if we focus on sexual trauma specifically, data from civilian studies have found an association between sexual victimization and suicidal mediation, attempted suicide and death by suicide. these relationships remain even after you control for additions or ptsd.ession although less work has been done examining the link between sexual trauma and suicide among vete
, they feel this way by belarus, united by language, religion, culture. >> thank you so much. we appreciate your time. we'll check back with you a little later on. thanks so much. >>> president obama has been working the phones. he's been talking to vladimir putin, now calling u.s. allies looking for support. we're live from moscow and ukraine coming up next. we're getting ready. your hepatitis c.forget it's slow moving, you tell yourself. i have time. after all there may be no symptoms for years. no wonder you try to push it to the back of your mind and forget it. but here's something you shouldn't forget. hepatitis c is a serious disease. if left untreated, it could lead to liver damage and potentially even liver cancer. if you are one of the millions of people with hepatitis c, you haven't been forgotten. there's never been a better time to rethink your hep c. because people like you may benefit from scientific advances. advances that could help you move on from hep c. now is the time to rethink hep c and talk to your doctor. visit hepchope.com to find out about treatment options. and re
the nature of our country. >> predfreedom of religion, then spin this however they want insurance is paying for it but it is catholic charities and hospitals, right? >> for example in boston they are no longer in the business and the service and ministry of adoption. why? is because unless they send children to gay couples, they no longer get any of the services. washington, d.c. the same thing. that is a fundamental change in the way the united states of america operates as a country. >> we will take a break and come back and continue. coming up next on "hannity"." >> i am not driven by change or circumstances it is driven by budge t budget. rather spend money on food stamps rather than strong military or support for our troops. >> the former vice president wasn't the only one to gdecisio to cut the military. that's coming up after the break and more on this special edition of "hannity." ...and a choice. take 4 advil in a day which is 2 aleve... ...for all day relief. "start your engines" which is why he's investing in his heart health by eating kellogg's raisin bran®. not only is kellogg
a difference in their lives. be divided by ethnicity, language and religion but they don't seem to be experiencing gridlock. the current presidential campaign does not evidence polarization, but rather the opposite. public debates have serviced more agreement than discord facing the country. a recent survey, 76% of afghans believe they are better off today than they were under the taliban. again, i think the american figures for americans would be much lower. it is easy to see why the afghans feel this way. 2012,n 2002 and afghanistan experienced a greater improvement in health, education and overall standard of living than any other country in the world as measured by the u.s. development program. literacy has increased from 12% of the population to 30%. estimated 900,000 boys were in school and virtually no girls. today, there are over 10 million children in school. nearly 40% of whom are girls. the number of teachers has toreased from 20,000 in 2002 175,000 today. higher education has also boomed . according to the world bank, student enrollment has increased to over0 in 2001
interpretation of their own religion. and then to claim persecution. the vast majority of germans are christian and nobody is claiming that the schooling system is a way that deprives them of the way of practice it of christianity. so i think i understand technically why as a matter of asylum would be rejected. but, let's hope somebody will exercise discretion and let them in on other grounds. >> yeah. the decision really lies with the administration. >> exactly. >> that is it for the panel. we will watch this one. stay tuned for oscar-nominated films you may have missed. uture is a pretty difficult thing to do. but, manufacturing in the united states means advanced technology. we learned that technology allows us to be craft oriented. no one's losing their job. there's no beer robot that has suddenly chased them out. the technology is actually creating new jobs. siemens designed and built the right tools and resources to get the job done. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn sym
investigators his religion allowed him to kill. the documents show he killed two animals. the men are tride separately. -- tried separately. >>> car play for drivers. car play gives iphone users a safer to use their phones while driving. maps, make phone calls, lizzen to music and -- listen toic. theyplan to offer it in the future. >>> a snowy start to the week, a winter storm hammers the area. the capital building. all you can see is the american flag blowing. all federal offices were closed today and people are warned to stay off the roads because icy conditions created treacherous driving conditions. one reporter in philadelphia found that out first hand. watch this. well, okay, thought it was going a happen. there it is. right there. fox 29 good day philadelphia reporter in new jersey this morning. he got too close to the snowplow. the spray from the wheels covered him. he was not injured. when you see the snowplows they just come by. >> she okay and his photograph -- he is okay and his photographer got the worse of it. >>> now to our chief meteorologist -- >> they just started going. o
with the religion it matt government of ukraine which it has pledged to do. it cannot only permit but must encourage international monitors to deploy throughout ukraine. these are the people that actually identify legitimate threats and we are asking, together with the government of ukraine, together with european community for large numbers of observers to come in here and monitor the situation and be the arbiters of truth versus fiction. russia, if it wanted to help deescalate this situation, could return its troops to the barracks, live by the 1997 base agreement and deescalate, rather than expand. now, we would prefer that. i come here today at the instruction of president obama to make it absolutely clear the united states of america would prefer to see this deescalated, managed through the structures of legal institutions, international institutions. we have worked many years in order to be able to deal with this kind of crisis. if russia does not choose to deescalate, if it is not willing to work directly with the government of ukraine as we hope they will be, then our partners will have abso
borders that has politics married to religion. >> that's something the uae can't count enance as being a sort of rival to the pour in abu dhabi. the likewise who have a wahabi outlook don't view the misslum brotherhood and its marriage of politics and islam as a legitimate force within their current tree. there are pro-muslim brotherhood supporters in these countries. they represent a genuine political force. >> worries these gulf states. qatar has had kawadari living there for 50 years. they have formed close links with the muslim brotherhood leadership, not just in egypt but across the region. they viewed it for a chance of expanding their interests. the others have viewed it as a threat to their interests. >> thank you very much for that, michael stephens >> reporter: thank you. >> in london there. >>> coming up here on the program, we will be taking a look at the big issues and the big players at the world's largest democracy prepares for national elections. >>> the little boy with big dreams. how a free school in bangladesh is giving him and other children hope. >> start with one
of their religion, that's already covered under current law. the only group not covered under current or federal state law in arizona for nondiscrimination is gays and lesbians. everybody else is already covered. >> that's a separate issue, of course. just to go back to what you were saying, if you actually read the language of the law, it was a terribly drawn law. it was full of language like if there's a compelling state interest, then you can compel someone to even violate what he calls his religious conscience. the point is i think reasonable people can agree and we should find the areas of agreement, not disagreement. for instance, i do think we should agree that people should not be forced by government to do something that seriously violates conscience if it is based on a legitimate religious recognized in your church. however, that doesn't give you the right to ban access to what was called public accommodations. that was the basis for the greatest legislation in this area, the civil rights act of 1964. i think we ought to go back to that and specify public accommodations. >> but again f
and prohibit discrimination based on age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or any other in proper standard. anncr: at jennie-o we heard of a place in iowa where every thursday people ride 10 miles for tacos. we thought we'd show up and surprise them with a better kind of taco made with jennie-o ground turkey cooked thoroughly to 165. i feed my kids turkey tacos over regular tacos any day. i think they are light and they are just fresh tasting. yeah. when i eat well, i feel well. anncr: it's time for a better taco. the tacos tonight were pretty much perfect. make the switch. look for jennie-o ground turkey in a store near you. >> reporter: according to t m z, the bird in miami beach prosecutors would not strike a plea deal in his dui i case reportedly d d eight is offering a no contest plea to reckless driving with sting strings attached. that thebeebs must submit to random drug testing for six to nine months. but apparently that is a no from his camp so get ready for a court room battle and in florida that includes cameras in the court room at stake justin could be tried for three
a hotly debated religion bill, business leaders across the state are calling on governor jan brewer to veto the proposed law or risk damaging the state's image and its economic recovery. >> opponents now include the arizona chamber of commerce, the arizona super bowl host committee, apple which has major interests in this state, and both americans airlines and mare rot. now, as local and national businesses are making their voices heard, politicians both in and outside of arizona are pushing to distance themselves from the law. three senators from arizona who voted for the bill are now, actually, get this, are urging the governor to veto it. and state senator steve pierce told chris hayes last night, it was some sort of crazy mixup. >> i believe it was going to be slowed down, wasn't going to come to the floor as soon as it did. i can tell you there's a number of us that we were terxting eac other madly, do we go with it, do we not? so we made a mistake. that's about all i can tell you is we went the wrong way. >> yes. they went the wrong way. and it's too late to reverse that becau
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
of vatileaks and the istituto per le opere di religione-- from the bank, from also some cases of corruption with the narco business, some cases of pedophilia. the credibility of the church is in terrible danger. what is necessary to do? how can we listen to the voices of the holy spirit in order to change? because everybody knew it was necessary to change many things. >> narrator: pope francis has shared that message in the most unlikely places. >> (translated): the phone rang. "i've got the pope on the line, and i really don't think we should keep him waiting." >> narrator: eugenio scalfari is the founder and editor-in-chief of la repubblicaitaly's leading newspaper on the left. he is also an atheist. >> (translated): the conversation we had started with some jokes, because that's his way. he said, "some of my advisors have warned me to be careful talking to you because you're a clever man and you'll try to convert me." me, converting the pope! >> narrator: the pope had phoned to invite scalfari for a chat. it would be a wide-ranging discussion which scalfari described in an article that
with her if she could come up with one single example of discrimination based on religion in arizona that people of faith have suffered through. she couldn't come up with one other than hypotheticals that maybe might happen. but she had no actual example of it actually having occurred. that's interesting because governor brewer specifically pointed that out. i want to play some of that exchange we had with nancy barta, one of the authors of s b 1062. >> senator, do you have any actual example of someone in arizona being forced to do something against their religious beliefs? >> well, in arizona it could be happening all the time, yes. >> do you have an actual example? >> well, surely. people may be being asked to -- >> i mean where it's actually happened. >> well, obviously if people aren't bringing it to court we don't know about it at this point. but we do know that without this law, people would not be able to defend themselves in court. >> but again, you can't name actually one example where this has happened. because people opposed to this say look, this is a problem -- this is
-worth. not community or religion. it is looking in the mirror in the morning. i am with that type of money. >> is that the american psyche? >> it is, but it gets emotional when the government says, you are worth less and not worth this much. be prepared for pushback. >> is compensation on three or four or five years, do people hate that? >> people ate that. but the total compensation of the executive compensation package being tied to long-term performance so your personal compensation is tied to the overall success or failure of the company for whom you work. is with us on a busy morning. we will go to provo, utah, g oogle glass. what about google fiber? changing the way that you are wired. with markets on the move, this is "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> good morning, everyone. "bloomberg surveillance," i am tom keene with scarlet fu and adam johnson. we are little bit better than we were at 6 a.m. this morning. robert kaplan is with us and we will talk about leadership with him. we talk about what you are really meant to do. today, it was to tie the bowtie. , the kenneth feinberg secon
a bill that set off a national debate over gay rights, religion and discrimination and subjected the state to blistering criticism from major corporations and political leaders from both parties. brewer's decision defused a national furor over gay rights and religious freedom. the bill backed by republicans in the state legislature was designed to give added protection from lawsuits to people who assert their religious beliefs in refusing service to gays. but opponents called it an open attack on gays that invited discrimination. the bill thrust arizona into the national spotlight last week after both chambers of the legislature approved it. thousands of pages of previously confidential documents from the clinton administration are set to be released soon. that's according to the national archives. the documents describe communications between bill clinton and his advisers. and potentially his wife, hillary. some of the records pertain to the former president's appointments to federal office. there's no specific date set for their release. a judge is preparing to set a third new
everybody else. we should treat everybody equally, no matter race, religion -- and so they would have been, i think, the state would the have been in trouble, because the super bowl was coming, and i'm sure other events was coming and people would have pulled out if that would have happened in arizona. i just don't like that either. >> magic johnson, thank you very much. great to be with you. >> you, too. >> see you on the final 25? >> i hope so. >>> we'll see if he's on the final 25. final concluding thoughts about magic, here to speak to the wpo, although not a member. his business interests go beyond those magic johnson theaters that you may be familiar with. he had lots of starbucks, which he ultimately sold back to howard and the starbucks company. his real estate interests, food service interests move far and wide. he has hotels in austin, hoboken and elsewhere and real estate holdings. magic the man, he is a huge, huge man, but what stands out about him is as big as he is, and he is big, he has an even bigger personality. and finally, there are two guys that i've met in my life who
loves her. >> less catering to the muslim religion than she is the muslim dollar or whatever. >> what do you think? do you think she's caving to the dollar or could you think she's afraid she will get ousted? >> not a simple answer. i think it's probably a combination of both but if you had to pick one or the oh, i think it's fear factor. look, there's repercussions. everybody knows it at this table, right? it's not just talk. they act, and they do some of the most vicious heinous things like murdering children, so wouldn't you be a little concerned? i don't blame her for that. >> if i'm concerned i'm in real trouble. from the public relation standpoint, if you were the head of the muslim country wouldn't you think it would be a good idea to at least step forward and say this does not represent all of us? >> i've never actually visualized myself being a spokesperson for the muslim countries, but, yes, i would have to say yes, i would. i have a question. how did the muslims even see that? you ever heard that somebody wants to be offend they will find a way to be offended. >> right, right,
provides that, quote, government shall not substantially burden a person's exercise of religion explicitly expanding that protection to allow businesses to cite a violation of their own religious beliefs as a defense if they're sued for failing to provide service. the bill was inspired by a new mexico supreme court ruling against a wedding photographer who refused service to a same-sex couple, and it massed quickly through the very conservative-controlled state legislature in arizona last week. in the last few days, pressure on brewer to veto the bill has grown from almost every corner. the arizona story crossed the threshold from political feeding frenzy into the mainstream. it was showing up on every platform yesterday, from espn to late-night talk shows. and though brewer claimed she was not influenced by cheers and boos from the crowd, it was clear from the outset that her state, whose reputation has already been tarnished over the years in the wake of the state's 2010 immigration law, had a lot to lose. on wednesday, the nfl, quote, began investigating the necessary steps to move next
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